San Francisco has a reputation among commuters for its terrible traffic, and it’s no wonder: A study by Washington-based traffic data company INRIX earlier this year found that San Franciscans spent an average of 82 hours stuck in traffic in 2016, making the city’s congestion the fourth worst in the world among 1,064 cities across five continents.

Among congestion’s many contributors, the difficulty of finding parking often flies under the radar. But another INRIX study in July of this yearfound that San Francisco drivers also spend 83 hours a year cruising around just to find a parking spot. The unfortunate circumstance unnecessarily keeps cars on the road, wasting fuel and ultimately generating an economic burden on the city of $655 million a year.

Last week, the city announced a broadened effort to combat the harrowing traffic and search for parking by expanding demand-based parking pricing to the entire city. The change, scheduled to begin at the start of 2018, will include every meter and city-owned lot and garage, making San Francisco the first US city to implement such a comprehensive program.

San Francisco has a reputation among commuters for its terrible traffic, and it’s no wonder: A study by Washington-based traffic data company INRIX earlier this year found that San Franciscans spent an average of 82 hours stuck in traffic in 2016, making the city’s congestion the fourth worst in the world among 1,064 cities across five continents.

Among congestion’s many contributors, the difficulty of finding parking often flies under the radar. But another INRIX study in July of this yearfound that San Francisco drivers also spend 83 hours a year cruising around just to find a parking spot. The unfortunate circumstance unnecessarily keeps cars on the road, wasting fuel and ultimately generating an economic burden on the city of $655 million a year.

Last week, the city announced a broadened effort to combat the harrowing traffic and search for parking by expanding demand-based parking pricing to the entire city. The change, scheduled to begin at the start of 2018, will include every meter and city-owned lot and garage, making San Francisco the first US city to implement such a comprehensive program.

San Francisco has a reputation among commuters for its terrible traffic, and it’s no wonder: A study by Washington-based traffic data company INRIX earlier this year found that San Franciscans spent an average of 82 hours stuck in traffic in 2016, making the city’s congestion the fourth worst in the world among 1,064 cities across five continents.

Among congestion’s many contributors, the difficulty of finding parking often flies under the radar. But another INRIX study in July of this yearfound that San Francisco drivers also spend 83 hours a year cruising around just to find a parking spot. The unfortunate circumstance unnecessarily keeps cars on the road, wasting fuel and ultimately generating an economic burden on the city of $655 million a year.

Last week, the city announced a broadened effort to combat the harrowing traffic and search for parking by expanding demand-based parking pricing to the entire city. The change, scheduled to begin at the start of 2018, will include every meter and city-owned lot and garage, making San Francisco the first US city to implement such a comprehensive program.

Article originally posted by qz.